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Professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society
Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change
M. Altaf Arain
Professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society
Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Posted Date:  2020-07-30

Dr. M. Altaf Arain is a professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and the Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change. His research interests include hydrometeorology; evapotranspiration, forest carbon and water cycles, land surface-atmosphere interaction schemes, eco-hydrological and global climate models. He has established Turkey Point Observatory to study energy, water and carbon exchange processes in managed forest and agricultural ecosystems in Great Lakes region. Turkey Point Observatory includes five research stations, where carbon, water and energy fluxes, soil biogeochemical and plant phenological processes are being studied, including an age-sequence (80, 46 and 18 year-old) of planted pine forests since 2003, a managed deciduous (90-year old) forest since 2012 and an agricultural site, started in June 2020. Dr. Arain is investigating the carbon sequestration potential of these different-age conifer and deciduous forests and exploring how these carbon and water cycles of forests will respond to future climate change and extreme weather events. He is also assessing how different forest management treatments (e.g. variable retention harvesting) will impact the forest growth trajectory, energy exchanges, hydrological processes in response to future climatic stresses and extreme events. This work is utilizing ground based (e.g. eddy covariance, soil CO2 efflux, sapflow, biometric) and airborne (e.g. drone and satellite remote sensing) measurements as well as ecosystem and hydrologic models. Turkey Point Observatory is part of Global Water Futures (GWF) and global Fluxnet programs. Dr. Arain is also involved in the Canadian FloodNet project to study impacts of extreme weather events on urban, semi-urban and rural catchments. Dr. Arain’s group has worked to further develop coupled Canadian Land Surface Scheme and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CLASS-CTEM-N+). CLASS-CTEM is used in the Canadian Earth System Model (CanESM) for climate predictions. His group has developed an integrated regional terrestrial ecosystem and hydrologic model (MESH-CTEM-N+) for catchment-scale studies. He has participated in the NACP Site-level and Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison (MsTMIP) initiatives. Dr. Arain obtained his Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from the NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan and MSc and PhD degrees from the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. He was a NASA Global Change Research Fellow (ESS program) and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia and the Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, The University of Arizona. He has served on grant review panels of NSERC-Canada, U.S. Department of Energy: Global Change Research Program and NASA Carbon Monitoring System Program. He was the president of the Canadian Geophysical Union (CGU) - Biogeosciences Section from 2009-2012 and member of the Operational Science Committee of Canadian Carbon Program (CCP) and Science Committee of the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network. He has also served as a member of Planning Committee of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) 2020 Open Science meeting. Dr. Arain has published more than 160 peer-reviewed journal articles. He was listed among Clarivate Analytics-Web of Science top 1% Highly-Cited Researchers in science and social science in 2018.

Dr. Altaf Arain’s Websites:  >>

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Senior Research Scientist
Laura Louise Bourgeau-Chavez
Senior Research Scientist
Michigan Technological University

Posted Date:  2020-06-29

Dr. Laura Bourgeau-Chavez is a senior research scientist at Michigan Tech Research Institute and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science (SFRES) of Michigan Technological University. Her main interests are in using passive and active microwave radar imaging for extracting moisture, inundation and biophysical information from wetland and upland landscapes. Her research includes targeted field campaigns to calibrate and validate remotely-sensed data and to better understand ecosystem function and disturbance effects. She has several projects focused on understanding the effects of land use, wildfire disturbance and/or climate change on ecosystems in North American boreal-taiga regions, tropical lowland and alpine peatlands and the coastal Great Lakes. Her work has led to integration of microwave, lidar and optical sensing for mapping and monitoring wetlands, forest soil moisture, forest biomass, invasive species and wildfire effects. Currently, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez is working on two wildfire projects in the boreal-arctic regions of Alaska and western Canada. Her SUSMAP project focuses on developing satellite data products to monitor drought conditions to better predict wildfire danger and wildfire behavior. The second boreal-arctic project is part of the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez’ ABoVE work is focused on studying the vulnerability of boreal and taiga ecosystems to wildfire through field and remote sensing analysis. The project is particularly concentrated on peatlands because the effects of wildfire in peatlands are largely unknown. Her work has led to remote mapping of peatland and upland ecotypes and two variables contributing to post-fire plant succession; burn severity in the organic soil layers and post-fire soil moisture. In addition, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has several Great Lakes projects focused on understanding the effects of nutrient loading on coastal wetlands and their susceptibility to invasive species, mapping the widespread invasive Phragmites australis and working with wetland managers in developing monitoring and remediation strategies. Using time-series analysis and radar polarimetry, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has developed methods for monitoring soil moisture and inundation from single band to quad-polarization radar data. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez serves as a co-chair of the Michigan Vernal Pool Partnership Steering Committee’s Remote Sensing Working Group. She also leads the Radar Wetlands and Surface Soil Moisture working group for NASA’s Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has been studying microwave sensing of forests and wetlands for thirty years. She has published over 75 journal articles and book chapters on using microwave and optical sensing for mapping and monitoring wetlands, forest soil moisture, forest biomass, invasive species, rare ecosystems and wildfire effects. She is a member of the SMAPVEX19/20 science experiment team focused on developing Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) for soil moisture retrieval from forests. She also leads the Radar Wetlands and Surface Soil Moisture working group for NASA’s Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment where she set the field sampling protocol and developed calibration algorithms for handheld water content reflectometry probes.

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Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Lee Thomas Murray
Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences
University of Rochester

Posted Date:  2020-05-28

Lee Murray is an Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. He develops and uses global and regional chemistry-transport and chemistry-climate models, informed by satellite and other observations, to explore the nexus of atmospheric chemistry and climate. He has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program, including the development of a 4-D methane isotopologue model to provide additional constraints on regional and global methane source contributions, and to understand changes in the global methane budget at and since the Last Glacial Maximum. He has also initiated continuous monitoring of CO2 and methane at multiple sites across New York State alongside an inverse modeling framework to provide top-down constraints on regional carbon emissions. To that end, he works with policy makers to assist them in characterizing in-state emissions, inform carbon mitigation strategies, and assess if carbon emission reduction goals are being met. Prior to Rochester, he was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, and received his Ph.D. training at Harvard University. Lee is also active in multiple international initiatives aimed at understanding couplings between atmospheric composition and climate, including the IGAC/SPARC Chemistry-Climate Modeling Initiative and the World Climate Research Programme AerChemMIP projects. He frequently engages in outreach efforts aimed at informing the public on carbon emissions and climate change. You can learn more about his research activities and see his live surface methane measurements at http://ees.rochester.edu/atmos.

Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Group  >>

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Associate Research Scientist
Guillermo N. Murray-Tortarolo
Associate Research Scientist
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Posted Date:  2020-04-28

Dr. Guillermo N. Murray-Tortarolo is an Associate Research Scientist at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad (IIES), where he leads the Trans-scalar Ecological Modeling lab. He studies the relationship among physical, biological and social components and how their interactions change from the local to global scales, particularly related to climate change, food security and human wellbeing. In the context of the carbon cycle, he is involved in the North American chapter of the Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment Project (RECCAP2) and is studying the carbon footprint of Mexican plastics, through a complete lifecycle analysis (generation, trade and disposal). He is also actively involved in academic courses on the Earth System and in increasing public awareness and understanding of global environmental issues through lectures, educational activities, talks and different outreach publications. With NACP, Guillermo is serving as a member of the Planning Committee for the (postponed) Open Science Meeting.

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Director of Climate Science
Sarah Cooley
Director of Climate Science
Ocean Conservancy

Posted Date:  2020-03-30

Dr. Sarah Cooley is the Director of Climate Science at Ocean Conservancy, in Washington DC. She has been at Ocean Conservancy since 2014, having also been the Director of the Ocean Acidification Program and also its Science Outreach Manager. She is currently a Coordinating Lead Author on the Oceans and Coastal Ecosystems chapter in Working Group II of the IPCC’s 6th Assessment Report, and part of the SOLAS/IMBER Ocean Acidification Group and the Advisory Board of the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC). Previously she worked at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Project Office. Dr. Cooley also serves as a member of the NACP Science Leadership Group. Dr. Cooley’s scholarly focus spans ocean carbon cycling, science communication, and science-based policy development. She was trained as an ocean carbon cycle scientist and numerical modeler, then moved into interdisciplinary science. At Ocean Conservancy, she works to educate and engage decision-makers and stakeholders from every political perspective at regional to international levels about ocean acidification, identifying ways that different groups can take concrete, stepwise action on the issue. In her work, Dr. Cooley combines science synthesis, strategic communications, political strategy and advocacy, and public advocacy. Follow her on Twitter at @CO2ley or connect on LinkedIn.

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Scientist and group lead
Abhishek Chatterjee
Scientist and group lead
NASA GSFC / USRA GESTAR

Posted Date:  2020-02-27

Abhishek Chatterjee is a scientist and group lead at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Prior to joining GMAO in 2015, he was a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, which included a stint as a Visiting Investigator at the Carnegie Department of Global Ecology (Stanford University). His research expertise lies in carbon cycle science, remote sensing, Earth system modeling and the development of geostatistical and spatial analyses tools for solving large-scale environmental problems. At GMAO, he is leading the development of carbon cycle assimilation and predictive modeling capabilities using NASA’s GEOS model. The use of predictive models to estimate atmospheric carbon growth rates over the next decade directly contribute to NASA’s mission of planning carbon-relevant observations from space. Previously during his PhD, he developed new geostatistical and inverse modeling techniques for modeling greenhouse gas source-sink distributions at global to regional scales. More recently, his focus has been on utilizing remote sensing observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 to explore the carbon-water-energy nexus, and quantify the vulnerability of the global carbon and water cycles to environmental changes and human interventions. He has authored/co-authored multiple peer-reviewed articles, including articles in Science and Nature Scientific Reports. Abhishek is part of multiple NASA mission and science Teams -- the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), the Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) and the Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). He works on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program and has also contributed as a lead chapter author for the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). He is highly engaged in various activities that advance the visibility of the carbon cycle science community, including chairing the Flux Working Group of NASA’s CMS Science Team and the Carbon Cycle Dynamics Working Group of NASA’s ABoVE Science Team.

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Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Chaoqun Lu
Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University

Posted Date:  2020-01-28

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu is an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology at Iowa State University. Her research uses a systems modeling approach to understand, quantify, and predict the terrestrial carbon-nutrient-water dynamics in response to changes in climate, land use, land management practices, and atmospheric composition at various spatial and temporal scales. She has been working on a few projects contributing to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Her recent carbon-related work focuses on reconstructing agriculture-driven land use and management history in the continental U.S., and assessing the consequent carbon storage change and carbon footprint through modeling. Her work has led to 75+ research articles that quantified the biogeochemical cycling, agricultural food production, greenhouse gas fluxes, and carbon and nutrient movement from land to water bodies. Prior to joining Iowa State University, she has been a research fellow and a postdoctoral researcher at Auburn University, and received her PhD training jointly from Chinese Academy of Sciences and Auburn University.

Lab Webpage  >>

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Professor
Thomas W. Boutton
Professor
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University

Posted Date:  2019-12-30

Tom Boutton is a Professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University. His research is aimed at improving our understanding of biogeochemical responses to changes in land cover and land uses in grasslands, savannas, and other dryland ecosystems. In these ecosystems, woody plant encroachment is a globally extensive land cover change that has been occurring during the past 150 years. This important vegetation change is likely driven by several potentially interacting local and global phenomena, including reduced fire frequencies, chronic livestock grazing, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and climate change. At present, Tom is evaluating the long-term (>50 years) impacts of woody plant encroachment, herbivory, and their interaction on soil C, N, P, and S storage and stoichiometry, trace gas fluxes, and on soil microbial community structure and function in juniper-oak savannas of the southern Great Plains. Stable isotope methodology is being utilized to clarify the mechanisms responsible for changes in elemental storage and turnover. Results from his studies should increase our ability to predict changes in ecosystem function following land cover/land use changes, and enhance the representation of these changes in coupled biogeochemistry-climate models. Tom received a B.A. in Biology from St. Louis University, an M.S. in Biology from University of Houston, and a Ph.D. in Botany from Brigham Young University. He is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and of the American Society of Agronomy.

Tom Boutton’s Website   >>

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Bassil El Masri
Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Murray State University

Posted Date:  2019-10-28

Bassil El Masri is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University. His research focuses on investigating the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions and how these interactions are affected by the changing climate. He uses multi-sensors remotely sensed data for estimating terrestrial ecosystem carbon and water fluxes and for scaling up site measurements to the regional and global scales. He also uses land surface models to understand the terrestrial ecosystem carbon, water, and nitrogen fluxes responses to environmental change. He was a contributing author to the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). He has been working on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Bassil completed his MS (2006) in Range Management from Texas Tech University, his PhD. (2011) in Geography from Indiana University-Bloomington and a postdoctoral appointment in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. https://sites.google.com/murraystate.edu/elmasri-lab/home

Environmental Modeling and Monitoring Lab  >>

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Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
David Moore
Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
University of Arizona

Posted Date:  2019-09-17

Dave Moore is an Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. He studies how ecosystems work. He uses both whole ecosystem measurements of carbon, water and energy exchange as well as smaller scale measurements – from tree growth to leaf level photosynthesis to soil microbial functions and nutrient cycling – to study how ecosystem processes respond to change. He uses models and airborne or satellite remote sensing data to integrate these diverse data sources and scale ecosystem processes to landscapes and the globe. He has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the effect of bark beetles on carbon cycling in the Western US, long term changes in the carbon cycle of the North Eastern US and currently, carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic. He also contributed to the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). Previously he has been a faculty member in the Geography Department at King’s College London, a visiting scientist at the National Ecological Observatory Network, and a post-doctoral researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University of Colorado’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. Dave did his graduate work at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Since 2007, Dave has helped to organize the Annual Summer Course in Flux Measurements and Advanced Modelling (The Fluxcourse), which is designed to cross train early career scientists in using measurements and models together. In 2019, he received the Excellence in Earth and Space Science Education Award from the American Geophysical Union.

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Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Forest Ecologist, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Posted Date:  2019-08-14

Kristina is a forest ecologist at the Smithsonian's Conservation Biology Institute's (SCBI) Conservation Ecology Center and at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s Center for Tropical Forest Science. She leads the Ecosystems and Climate Program for the Smithsonian-led Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), which is the only forest monitoring network making standardized measurements in all the world's major forest biomes. Her research focuses on interactions of forest ecosystems worldwide with Earth’s changing climate. Her research group employs a variety of methods including data synthesis, field research, and modeling to understanding how global change is altering forests around the world and how changes to forest ecosystems will either mitigate or exacerbate climate change. Her research focuses on ForestGEO sites, including the SCBI ForestGEO plot, for which she is one of the Principal Investigators. She led the creation of ForC, a large open-access database of forest carbon stocks and annual fluxes, and is using it to help characterize the potential for climate change mitigation through forest conservation and restoration. Kristina received an undergraduate degree in biology from Wheaton College (2002) and a PhD from the University of New Mexico (2007). In 2019, she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

Forest Global Earth Observatory  >>

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Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
Tara Hudiburg
Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences

University of Idaho

Posted Date:  2019-07-20

Dr. Tara Hudiburg is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho. Before coming to Idaho, she completed her PhD and MS degrees in Forest Science at Oregon State University and a postdoctoral appointment in Plant Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her research investigates the impacts of climate, disturbance, and management on terrestrial biogeochemical cycling, particularly GHG implications. She is an NSF Early Career award recipient and was recently awarded a 2019 PECASE. She uses data-model frameworks to improve and validate process-based models used for predicting future carbon cycle impacts in forest and agricultural ecosystems. Dr. Hudiburg is experimenting with flux methods at her field sites in the Northern Rockies in order develop reliable, inexpensive, and low-power requirement carbon and water balance measurement systems for mountainous terrain.

Dr. Tara Hudiburg Website  >>

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