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Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Chaoqun Lu
Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University

Posted Date:  2020-01-28

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu is an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology at Iowa State University. Her research uses a systems modeling approach to understand, quantify, and predict the terrestrial carbon-nutrient-water dynamics in response to changes in climate, land use, land management practices, and atmospheric composition at various spatial and temporal scales. She has been working on a few projects contributing to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Her recent carbon-related work focuses on reconstructing agriculture-driven land use and management history in the continental U.S., and assessing the consequent carbon storage change and carbon footprint through modeling. Her work has led to 75+ research articles that quantified the biogeochemical cycling, agricultural food production, greenhouse gas fluxes, and carbon and nutrient movement from land to water bodies. Prior to joining Iowa State University, she has been a research fellow and a postdoctoral researcher at Auburn University, and received her PhD training jointly from Chinese Academy of Sciences and Auburn University.

Lab Webpage  >>

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Professor
Thomas W. Boutton
Professor
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University

Posted Date:  2019-12-30

Tom Boutton is a Professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University. His research is aimed at improving our understanding of biogeochemical responses to changes in land cover and land uses in grasslands, savannas, and other dryland ecosystems. In these ecosystems, woody plant encroachment is a globally extensive land cover change that has been occurring during the past 150 years. This important vegetation change is likely driven by several potentially interacting local and global phenomena, including reduced fire frequencies, chronic livestock grazing, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and climate change. At present, Tom is evaluating the long-term (>50 years) impacts of woody plant encroachment, herbivory, and their interaction on soil C, N, P, and S storage and stoichiometry, trace gas fluxes, and on soil microbial community structure and function in juniper-oak savannas of the southern Great Plains. Stable isotope methodology is being utilized to clarify the mechanisms responsible for changes in elemental storage and turnover. Results from his studies should increase our ability to predict changes in ecosystem function following land cover/land use changes, and enhance the representation of these changes in coupled biogeochemistry-climate models. Tom received a B.A. in Biology from St. Louis University, an M.S. in Biology from University of Houston, and a Ph.D. in Botany from Brigham Young University. He is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and of the American Society of Agronomy.

Tom Boutton’s Website   >>

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Bassil El Masri
Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Murray State University

Posted Date:  2019-10-28

Bassil El Masri is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University. His research focuses on investigating the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions and how these interactions are affected by the changing climate. He uses multi-sensors remotely sensed data for estimating terrestrial ecosystem carbon and water fluxes and for scaling up site measurements to the regional and global scales. He also uses land surface models to understand the terrestrial ecosystem carbon, water, and nitrogen fluxes responses to environmental change. He was a contributing author to the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). He has been working on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Bassil completed his MS (2006) in Range Management from Texas Tech University, his PhD. (2011) in Geography from Indiana University-Bloomington and a postdoctoral appointment in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. https://sites.google.com/murraystate.edu/elmasri-lab/home

Environmental Modeling and Monitoring Lab  >>

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Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
David Moore
Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
University of Arizona

Posted Date:  2019-09-17

Dave Moore is an Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. He studies how ecosystems work. He uses both whole ecosystem measurements of carbon, water and energy exchange as well as smaller scale measurements – from tree growth to leaf level photosynthesis to soil microbial functions and nutrient cycling – to study how ecosystem processes respond to change. He uses models and airborne or satellite remote sensing data to integrate these diverse data sources and scale ecosystem processes to landscapes and the globe. He has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the effect of bark beetles on carbon cycling in the Western US, long term changes in the carbon cycle of the North Eastern US and currently, carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic. He also contributed to the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). Previously he has been a faculty member in the Geography Department at King’s College London, a visiting scientist at the National Ecological Observatory Network, and a post-doctoral researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University of Colorado’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. Dave did his graduate work at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Since 2007, Dave has helped to organize the Annual Summer Course in Flux Measurements and Advanced Modelling (The Fluxcourse), which is designed to cross train early career scientists in using measurements and models together. In 2019, he received the Excellence in Earth and Space Science Education Award from the American Geophysical Union.

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Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Forest Ecologist, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Posted Date:  2019-08-14

Kristina is a forest ecologist at the Smithsonian's Conservation Biology Institute's (SCBI) Conservation Ecology Center and at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s Center for Tropical Forest Science. She leads the Ecosystems and Climate Program for the Smithsonian-led Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), which is the only forest monitoring network making standardized measurements in all the world's major forest biomes. Her research focuses on interactions of forest ecosystems worldwide with Earth’s changing climate. Her research group employs a variety of methods including data synthesis, field research, and modeling to understanding how global change is altering forests around the world and how changes to forest ecosystems will either mitigate or exacerbate climate change. Her research focuses on ForestGEO sites, including the SCBI ForestGEO plot, for which she is one of the Principal Investigators. She led the creation of ForC, a large open-access database of forest carbon stocks and annual fluxes, and is using it to help characterize the potential for climate change mitigation through forest conservation and restoration. Kristina received an undergraduate degree in biology from Wheaton College (2002) and a PhD from the University of New Mexico (2007). In 2019, she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

Forest Global Earth Observatory  >>

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Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
Tara Hudiburg
Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences

University of Idaho

Posted Date:  2019-07-20

Dr. Tara Hudiburg is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho. Before coming to Idaho, she completed her PhD and MS degrees in Forest Science at Oregon State University and a postdoctoral appointment in Plant Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her research investigates the impacts of climate, disturbance, and management on terrestrial biogeochemical cycling, particularly GHG implications. She is an NSF Early Career award recipient and was recently awarded a 2019 PECASE. She uses data-model frameworks to improve and validate process-based models used for predicting future carbon cycle impacts in forest and agricultural ecosystems. Dr. Hudiburg is experimenting with flux methods at her field sites in the Northern Rockies in order develop reliable, inexpensive, and low-power requirement carbon and water balance measurement systems for mountainous terrain.

Dr. Tara Hudiburg Website  >>

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