Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Sciences
Sandip Pal
Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Sciences

Department of Geosciences, Texas Tech University

Posted Date:  2022-06-13

Sandip Pal is an Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Sciences in the Department of Geosciences at Texas Tech University. Sandip is also the academic advisor of Atmospheric Science Minor program in Texas Tech and leads the Boundary Layer Meteorology Research Group. His research expertise includes boundary layer meteorology, land-atmosphere interaction, biosphere-atmosphere interaction with emphasis on carbon cycle science via using ground-based, airborne and satellite borne observations, in particular, lidar remote sensing. Sandip worked in four different countries in 9 different universities/institutions (e.g., Penn State, University of Virginia, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE), LMD-Ecole Polytechnique). He has a BSc and MSc in physics from the University of Calcutta and University of Kalyani, respectively, and he earned his Ph.D. (magna cum laude) in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany in Feb 2009. He is the author and coauthor of nearly 50 peer-reviewed articles and numerous conference and symposium proceedings and technical and scientific reports and open access datasets. He has served as the reviewer for more than 50 high-impact international journals of meteorology and atmospheric sciences and editorial board members of two international journals (Atmospheric Science Letters of Royal Met Society and Frontiers in Remote Sensing-Lidar Section). Recently, Pal served as a Guest Editor / Special Collection Organizer of an AGU Special Collection entitled “Carbon Weather: Toward the next generation of regional greenhouse gas inversion systems.” Recently, Pal has been actively involved in NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) project to improve carbon flux quantification by exploring the intersection of fluxes and weather and his main research interests within this project lies in finding the synoptic controls on the greenhouse gas transport in the lower troposphere, in particular, in the atmospheric boundary layer. Recently, one of his published work (Observations of Greenhouse Gas Changes Across Summer Frontal Boundaries in the Eastern United States) in the AGU Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres has been recognized as a top-cited paper (2020-2021), counting more than 24 citations in one year. Additionally, Pal was actively involved in other carbon cycle science and boundary layer meteorology research projects in the US and Europe including CO2-MEGAPARIS to quantify the GHG emission of Paris Megacity; COPS: Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study; MATERHORN: The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program. Pal has been actively working in four funded research grants where he was either PI or Co-PI funded by NASA, NOAA.

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Director, Human Dimensions Program
Jeffrey Thomas Morisette
Director, Human Dimensions Program
Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service

Posted Date:  2022-04-28

Starting with a NASA Carbon Cycle and Ecosystem funded project “Helping North American Carbon Program investigators better utilize MODIS data product” (2006-2008 as Principal Investigator) and then through a detail at NASA headquarters in the Applied Science Area (2006-2007), Jeff was involved in some of the early work of NACP. He also helped established the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites Land Product Validation (LPV) subgroup and coordinated MODIS land validation activities from 1998 to 2008. For several validation efforts, carbon flux towers play an important role in scaling carbon-related vegetation monitoring from ground-based measurements to satellite-derived products. Jeff served as chair for the User Working Groups for both the Land Processes (2016-2018) and Oak Ridge National Lab (2003-2007) Distributed Active Archive Centers. He is using this experience to help the NACP Science Leadership Group (SLG) consider high-level issues concerning logistics, coordination of infrastructure, and data management from the perspective of maximizing scientific returns. Since 2008, Jeff has worked closely with land managers on the use of geospatial information to inform decisions. From 2008 to 2016, he worked for the USGS. Part of that time was serving as the inaugural director of the Department of Interior’s North Central Climate Science Center. From 2017 to 2020, he was the Chief Scientist for the National Invasive Species Council. In 2020 he transferred to the Forest Service as the director of the Human Dimensions (HD) program at the Rocky Mountain Research Station. The mission of the HD program is to provide relevant and actionable science that promotes better understanding and integration of the social, economic, and ecological dimensions of resource management and planning under a shared stewardship vision for our nation’s forests and grasslands. Within that mission, the HD program considers one of the most prominent challenges facing natural resource planners, managers, and policymakers is developing a better understanding of the human and management implications of changing climate patterns and conditions. Furthermore, there is considerable work within the Forest Service related to carbon cycle science on forests and rangelands. Jeff’s work with the NACP Science Leadership Group (SLG) is focused on building and exploiting synergies between NACP, human dimensions research, and carbon cycles science within the Forest Service.

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Research Scientist
Seongeun Jeong
Research Scientist
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Posted Date:  2022-03-30

Dr. Seongeun Jeong is a Research Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Dr. Jeong conducts research to quantify emissions for major greenhouse gases (GHGs) using atmospheric measurements, transport models, and Bayesian statistics. With a background in developing a land surface model, he focuses on improving atmospheric transport simulations to reduce uncertainty in model predictions. Dr. Jeong is also interested in applying robust statistical methods to GHG-related research, including hierarchical Bayesian methods. While working for more than a decade at LBNL, he focused on quantifying CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions to help guide policymakers working on various research projects from household to regional scales. Dr. Jeong is currently the principal investigator for a NASA Carbon Cycle Science project to estimate California's 2020 CO2 emission budget. He also leads the atmospheric transport simulation and inverse modeling team in a California Energy Commission project to quantify CH4 emissions from California's San Joaquin Valley. He has recently developed a spatial inventory for California's dairy CH4 emissions using artificial intelligence (AI) and remotely sensed imagery and continues to apply AI technology to earth sciences. In addition, for the past several years, Dr. Jeong has been working on simulating wind and solar energy generation to mitigate climate change impact, utilizing his expertise in meteorological modeling. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Research Hydrologist, Earth Systems Processes Division
Michelle Walvoord
Research Hydrologist, Earth Systems Processes Division
U.S. Geological Survey

Posted Date:  2022-02-28

Michelle Walvoord is a Research Hydrologist in the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) Earth System Processes Division in Denver, Colorado. She holds degrees from Hamilton College (Bachelor of Arts in Geology) and New Mexico Tech (Master of Science in Hydrology and Doctor of Philosophy in Earth Sciences). Throughout her career with USGS, Dr. Walvoord has worked collaboratively with biogeochemists, ecologists, and geophysicists to advance understanding of carbon dynamics in environments ranging from the arid southwestern US to boreal Alaska. To carbon cycling studies, she brings expertise in non-isothermal multiphase flow and transport. Her research relies on a blend of field, statistical, and process-based modeling approaches at multiple spatial and temporal scales to address coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to climate and other perturbations including wildfire. She co-led a NASA Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experient (ABoVE) project titled “Vulnerability of inland waters and the aquatic carbon cycle to changing permafrost and climate across boreal northwestern North America” that led to new insight into thaw processes and their cascading consequences in headwater watersheds and low-lying lake systems in interior Alaska. Dr. Walvoord has authored and co-authored numerous publications that address complexities in coupled carbon cycle and water cycle response to climate change. She contributed to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate released 2019. Dr. Walvoord currently serves as an Associate Editor for Water Resources Research and also serves on several elected and invited national and international committees and boards including: US Permafrost Association; American Geophysical Union Hydrology Section committee for Justice, Equality, Diversity and Inclusion; Terrestrial Multidisciplinary distributed Observatories for the Study of Arctic Connection (t-MOSAIC) Land-Water Processes Action Group; and the Permafrost Action Team for the National Science Foundation’s Study of Environmental Arctic Change Project. As an affiliated faculty member with Colorado School of Mines, University of Colorado, Boulder and Université Laval, she mentors graduate students studying the impacts of a diminishing cryosphere on hydrogeologic systems in high altitude and high latitude regions.

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Professor, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Maria A. Tzortziou
Professor, Earth & Environmental Sciences
CCNY City University of New York/ Columbia University LDEO

Posted Date:  2022-01-31

Maria Tzortziou is Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Director of the Bio-Optics Laboratory at the Center for Discovery and Innovation of The City College of The City University of New York, and affiliated Research Professor with Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. She is also Research Scientist in the Science Division of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, where she currently serves as the Deputy Program Applications Lead for PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem), a strategic NASA satellite mission that will extend key ocean color, aerosol, and cloud data records for Earth system and climate studies. Her research integrates multidisciplinary datasets, satellite observations, and ecosystem models to provide mechanistic insights into the impacts of human and environmental pressures on biogeochemical cycles and ecological processes along the continuum of wetland, estuarine, and open ocean ecosystems. A key objective of her research is applying results to link science to practice and enhance decision support systems. Dr. Tzortziou has led numerous field campaigns across a range of environments, from the tropics to the Arctic, and has received two NASA Group Achievement Awards (2016, 2019) as Science Team member of the DISCOVER-AQ and OWLETS missions. Tzortziou is on the Science Steering Committee for the Ocean Carbon Biogeochemistry Program, the Science Leadership Board of the North American Carbon Program, the Long Island Sound Study Program Science and Technical Advisory Committee, and member of the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS). She has contributed to several policy-relevant and science planning publications, including the “Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report” (SOCCR2), the “Marine Biogeochemistry in the Coastal Arctic: Towards Improved Quantitative Understanding of the Controls on Marine Biogeochemical Processes in the Arctic Coastal Zone, and Their Impacts on Climate and the Food Web: A White Paper for DOE’s Regional and Global Model Analysis (RGMA) Program”, and “Earth's Living Ocean: The 2017-2027 Advanced Science Plan for NASA's Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Research”. She has been Associate Editor for Biogeosciences, Remote Sensing, and Guest Editor for Earth-Science Reviews. Tzortziou serves as the Science Lead for the “Coastal Resilience” Theme of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Earth System Sciences and Remote Sensing Technologies. She is also the Applied Science Lead and Science Team member for NASA's recently selected Earth Venture Instrument-5 Investigation GLIMR (Geostationary Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer), a new instrument competitively selected by NASA to provide unique observations of ocean biology, chemistry, and ecology that are needed to improve coastal resource management, enhance decision making, and enable rapid response to natural and man-made coastal hazards.

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Research Scientist, NASA Earth eXchange (NEX),
Biospheric Science Branch (SGE)
Taejin Park
Research Scientist, NASA Earth eXchange (NEX),
Biospheric Science Branch (SGE)

NASA Ames Research Center / BAERI

Posted Date:  2021-11-29

Dr. Taejin Park is a research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute and NASA Earth eXchange (NEX) at Ames Research Center. Before joining the NEX team, he received a Ph.D. in Earth & Environment from Boston University and M.S/B.S in Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering at the Korea University in Korea. His research focuses on remote sensing of vegetation and its application for monitoring global environmental changes. Particularly, he is interested in understanding processes (e.g., climate change, LCLUC) impacting terrestrial ecosystems and carbon cycle. He is currently working on two NASA funded projects: Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) and Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI). For CMS project, he focuses on developing a carbon monitoring system across Mexico using Landsat and machine learning approach. Within the GEDI team, he uses forest structure information from GEDI data to constrain a biophysical model called Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitation (ASRL) for mapping and projecting forest height, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential. Additionally, he has been actively interacting with researchers in the NEX team and international collaborators to build a global-scale geostationary satellite product suite (GeoNEX). He also continues his research on the arctic and boreal vegetation monitoring. Along with this effort, he regularly engages in outreach efforts at informing the public on changing climate and terrestrial ecosystem changes by contributing to the international climate report “State of Climate” and NOAA’s “Arctic Report Card”.

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Assistant Professor, Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science
Manuel Helbig
Assistant Professor, Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science
Dalhousie University

Posted Date:  2021-10-29

Dr. Manuel Helbig is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS, Canada. He completed his PhD at the Université de Montréal and postdocs at McGill University and McMaster University before moving to Atlantic Canada. His research broadly focuses on the role of land-atmosphere interactions for regional to global climate change. He uses eddy covariance flux measurements of greenhouse gases and energy, remote sensing observations, and atmospheric boundary layer modelling to disentangle the various feedbacks shaping near-surface climate dynamics. He has worked in the Russian and Canadian Arctic, in the boreal forests of northwestern Canada, and more recently is interested in land-atmosphere feedbacks in humid climates of eastern Canada. His past research has advanced our understanding of how permafrost thaw and climate warming alters net CO2 and methane exchange in organic-rich landscapes and how extensive peatlands shape local climatic conditions in the boreal biome. Current NSERC-funded research addresses climate and carbon cycle impacts of hydroelectric power generation in eastern Canada and how temperate forests in densely forested regions of eastern Canada affect heatwave and drought development. To better understand feedbacks across the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, he is setting up a long-term land-atmosphere observatory integrating observations from the subsurface to the free troposphere. He is currently serving as guest editor for the special issue "Land-atmosphere interactions: Integrating surface flux and atmospheric boundary layer measurements" and is on the AmeriFlux organizing committee for the "AmeriFlux Theme - Year of Water Fluxes".

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Research Scientist
Inke Forbrich
Research Scientist
Marine Biological Laboratory Woods Hole, MA

Posted Date:  2021-09-30

Dr. Inke Forbrich is a Research Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA. Before coming to the US, she completed her PhD in landscape ecology at the University of Greifswald in Germany. Her research interests focus on how hydrological and biogeochemical factors regulate carbon sequestration and GHG release in wetlands and coastal ecosystems. She is currently studying how sea level rise is changing coastal wetland carbon storage as well as exchange rates with atmosphere and coastal ocean at the Plum Island Ecosystems LTER. There, she has initiated the longest running time series of flux tower measurements in a tidal wetland in the US, which is shared via the AmeriFlux network. Using this data set, she has contributed to the first US wide map of coastal wetland gross primary production using MODIS imagery. Furthermore, she has recently been awarded a DOE ESS grant to study and improve modelling of the impact of fluctuating salinity on biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands with a special focus on the role of vascular plants. She is participating in the Coastal Carbon Research Coordination Network working group to model methane fluxes of brackish and saline wetlands as well as in the Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment Project (RECCAP2) ‘estuaries and blue carbon ecosystems’ working group.

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Associate Research Professor, Department of Geographical Sciences
Varaprasad Bandaru
Associate Research Professor, Department of Geographical Sciences
University of Maryland

Posted Date:  2021-08-30

Dr. Varaprasad (Prasad) Bandaru is an Associate Research Professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, MD. His research broadly focuses on understanding how different land use and land management practices in agriculture impact crop growth dynamics, carbon, nitrogen, water and other nutrient fluxes under different climatic conditions. Furthermore, he develops tools and decision support systems using remote sensing and mechanistic crop models to monitor agricultural systems, and help in decision making to improve agricultural productivity, soil health and environment. His ongoing projects focus on developing a cropland carbon monitoring system to estimate carbon and nitrogen fluxes on agricultural lands in the U.S and Canada (NASA CMS), understanding regional carbon dynamics with crop residue burning and alternative management practices in Thailand (NASA LCLUC), and understanding the performance of diversified cropping systems in terms of carbon dynamics under current and future climatic conditions (USDA-NIFA-AFRI). He is a member of the NASA CMS Science Team (2016-present) and the NASA LCLUC Science Team (2018-present). He received a PhD in Plant and Soil Sciences from the University of Delaware. Later, he worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Before he joined UMD, he worked at University of California, Davis and at Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, College Park, MD.

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Computational Earth System Scientist and Group Leader for the Computational Earth Sciences Group
Forrest M. Hoffman
Computational Earth System Scientist and Group Leader for the Computational Earth Sciences Group
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Posted Date:  2021-07-29

Forrest M. Hoffman is a Distinguished Computational Earth System Scientist and the Group Leader for the Computational Earth Sciences Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). As a resident researcher in ORNL’s Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) and a member of ORNL’s Computational Sciences & Engineering Division (CSED), Forrest develops Earth system models (ESMs) and uses some of the fastest supercomputers in the world to apply those models to investigate the global carbon cycle and feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the rest of the Earth system. With a tenure at ORNL than spans more than 30 years, he contributed to research in landscape ecology and ecosystem ecology, often bringing computational methods to bear on large-scale ecological questions, before completing his PhD in Earth System Science from the University of California Irvine in 2015. Forrest is especially interested in benchmarking the fidelity or scientific performance of models by confronting them with best-available observational data. He leads a multi-institutional team in a project that synthesizes in situ and remote sensing data and develops the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) software package, which evaluates land model output and scores model performance for a variety of statistical and functional metrics. Funded by the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth and Environmental Systems Sciences Division (EESSD), the project is called the Reducing Uncertainties in Biogeochemical Interactions through Synthesis and Computation (RUBISCO) Science Focus Area (SFA). Forrest and his collaborators in the RUBISCO SFA perform simulations and analysis to quantify and reduce uncertainties associated with biogeochemical feedbacks, and they have recently completed a few Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 6 (CMIP6) simulations with DOE’s ESM, called the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM). RUBISCO currently sponsors two sustained working group activities designed to engage the broader research community in data synthesis and creation of new evaluation metrics: the Soil Carbon Dynamics Working Group and the RUBISCO-AmeriFlux Working Group. Forrest also applies data mining methods, using high performance computing, to problems in landscape ecology, ecosystem modeling, remote sensing, and large-scale climate data analytics. He is particularly interested in using machine learning methods to explore the influence of terrestrial and marine ecosystems on hydrology and climate. In 2020, Forrest was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for distinction in developing, comparing, and evaluating Earth system models with an emphasis on global biogeochemical cycles and feedbacks to the climate system. He is serving on the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting Program Committee (FMPC) for the Biogeosciences Section again this year, and he is organizing sessions at both the AGU Fall Meeting in December and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in January. Forrest is an Associate Editor for Data-Driven Climate Sciences in Frontiers in Big Data, the Editor-in-Chief for the Climate and Environment Section in Climate, and a member of the editorial board for the new journal AI in Geosciences. Forrest is also a Joint Faculty Member in the University of Tennessee’s Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering in nearby Knoxville, Tennessee, and just for fun in his spare time this past Spring semester, he taught a virtual graduate course on Global Ecohydrology & Biogeochemistry in the department.

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Professor, Plant and Soil Sciences
Rodrigo Vargas
Professor, Plant and Soil Sciences
University of Delaware

Posted Date:  2021-07-01

Rodrigo Vargas is a Professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Delaware. He completed his PhD at the University of California-Riverside and a postdoc at the University of California-Berkeley. His research interests focus on how biophysical factors regulate greenhouse gas dynamics in terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. He studies soil-plant-atmosphere interactions to understand and quantify the response of ecosystems to management, extreme events, and global environmental change. His research spans from data mining and applying machine learning approaches, to remote sensing and micrometeorological measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes, and modeling of soil carbon and soil moisture at multiple spatial and temporal scales. His current projects focus on developing a carbon monitoring system across Mexico (NASA), understanding terrestrial-aquatic carbon dynamics in salt marshes (NSF), improvement of global estimates of ecosystem respiration (NASA), and developing cyberinfrastructure for downscaling satellite-derived soil moisture (NSF). Vargas has participated in developing decision support systems and policy-relevant applications with contributions to the “Mexican Report on Climate Change”, the FAO of the United Nations report “Status of the World’s Soil Resources”, and the “Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report” (SOCCR2). He formerly served on the NACP Science Steering Group (now the Science Leadership Group), the NEON soil sensor technical working group, and the North American Forestry Commission. Currently, he is on the Science Steering Committees of AmeriFlux and the Mexican Carbon Program, and is a member of the editorial boards of Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, Oecologia, and Global Change Biology. Finally, he is a member of the cluster on Science and the Arts in the Earth and Environmental Science of the Franklin Institute, a member of the U.S. National Committee for Soil Science of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and a fellow of the Earth Leadership Program.

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Scientist in the Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division
Sha Feng
Scientist in the Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

Posted Date:  2021-05-27

Dr. Sha Feng is a scientist in the Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division at PNNL. Prior to joining PNNL at the end of 2020, she was an assistant research professor in the Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at PennState. She was a post-doctoral fellow at the UCLA Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Her research interest lies in carbon cycle science with a focus on the interaction of land and atmosphere. Her expertise is atmospheric numerical modeling from urban to regional to global scales. For the past few years, as part of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) project, she focused on improving the uncertainty quantification in CO2 modeling using the ensemble modeling and calibration approach, aiming to improve the CO2 flux estimation. Dr. Feng has also been an active member of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2/3 (OCO-2/3) science team. She applied her modeling expertise to estimating the urban fossil fuel emission with the constraints of satellite data. Currently at PNNL, Dr. Feng extends her research to the global scale within the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) project, investigating the atmosphere’s CO2 transport and response to emissions scenarios. Dr. Feng has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Her newly awarded project entitled “Regional inverse modeling in North and South America” under the NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program will enhance her engagement with the NACP community. She holds a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Science and Technology of China, and a B.Sc. in Atmospheric Science from Sun Yat-Sen University in China.

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Professor-Researcher at the Oceanology department
Cecilia Chapa-Balcorta
Professor-Researcher at the Oceanology department
Universidad del Mar (Mexico)

Posted Date:  2021-04-29

Cecilia Chapa-Balcorta is Professor-Researcher at the Oceanology department in Universidad del Mar (UMAR) in Puerto Angel, Oaxaca, México. She holds a degree in Oceanology (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, UABC), a Master of Science Degree in Environmental and Marine Science (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and a PhD in Coastal Oceanography (Hons.) (UABC). Her research focuses on the marine CO2 system, the role of the ocean on the carbon cycle and ocean acidification. She is particularly interested in the coupling of physical and chemical processes in the ocean, especially on the environmental drivers that control the spatiotemporal variability of carbon in the ocean. She couples in situ data with satellite oceanography to be able to identify said drivers. Cecilia has led national and international research projects. She is PI of three research projects to study ocean acidification in the tropical Mexican Pacific. Her research has provided the first publications related to the CO2 system at the Gulf of Tehuantepec and has contributed to define smaller scale upwelling regions new to science in the same region. She is a member of the Mexican National Researchers System since 2016. Cecilia serves as coordinator of the Oceanographic Research group is leader of academic group “Marine ecosystem dynamics and land-ocean interactions”, both at UMAR and founder of the Carbon Biogeochemistry Lab. She is a member of the Global Ocean Acidification Observation Network and serves in the scientific committee of the Mexican Carbon Program since 2019 and in the executive council of the Latin American Ocean Acidification Network (LAOCA) since January 2021. She is a contributing author of the first State of the Carbon Cycle in Mexico report http://pmcarbono.org/pmc/publicaciones/reportes_nacionales.php. She is part of the Aquatic Continuum OCB-NACP Focus Group (https://www.us-ocb.org/ocb-nacp-science-focus-group/) She served as a member of the Planning Committee for the 7th NACP Open Science Meeting, held virtually in March 2021.

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Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Ankur Rashmikant Desai
Professor, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
University of Wisconsin

Posted Date:  2021-03-15

Ankur has spent the past couple decades poking the foundations and edges that is regional carbon cycle science and developing the ability to translate ideas across the varied sub-disciplines that make up this field. His work has advanced new concepts in eddy covariance flux tower synthesis, upscaling and downscaling of multi-scale flux and greenhouse gas observations, integrating terrestrial-aquatic carbon transfer, diagnosing land use - atmosphere feedbacks, and constraining ecosystem models with diverse data sources. Currently, he is the Reid Bryson Professor of Climate, People, & Environment in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he's been since 2007. His Ecometeorology lab's multi-talented students, post-docs, and technicians are experts at pushing the lab into research directions that Ankur never expected to venture, but always with fruitful results. Starting from his Ph.D. days under Ken Davis at Penn State, Ankur has always been interested in scaling landscape complexity and human land management, especially with eddy covariance tower networks. Accomplishing some of this work has led to a growing collection of long-term flux towers now operated by the lab, including five Ameriflux core sites in northern Wisconsin and Michigan that encompass two forests, including one of the few old-growth stands of the Midwest USA, two fen wetlands, with methane flux observations, and one globally unique very tall tower (LEF/US-PFa) that is also a NOAA greenhouse gas tall tower observatory and TCCON site. The tall tower now has almost a quarter-century of hourly carbon and water flux, and a decade of methane flux observations. In the past decade, new sites focused on agricultural systems and experiments, including two part of a USDA ARS station, and lakes, including one part of an LTER site. Much of this work extends continentally to globally through collaborative synthesis and scaling projects, including a macrosystems biology project on integrating forest management into earth system models, continued efforts on integrating atmospheric, terrestrial, ands satellite data for regional inverse modeling, one on developing informatics tools for reproducible model-data assimilation (PEcAn), and an ongoing collaboration with scientists at NEON on new approaches to scaling flux measurements with Environmental Response Functions. This latter work recently culminated in a large NSF-supported field experiment, the Chequamegon Heterogenous Ecosystem Energy-balance Study Enabled by a High-density Extensive Array of Detectors (CHEESEHEAD19). A 20 flux tower network over a 10x10 km area was deployed for four months and coupled with high space/time/wavelength resolution remote sensing, ecological vegetation and soil sampling, airborne atmospheric and flux mapping, and atmospheric boundary-layer profiling. Ankur hopes this benchmark open-access dataset serves as a key resource for the research community. Ankur formerly served on the NACP Science Steering Group and the NEON Science, Technology, and Education Advisory Committee (STEAC). Currently, he is on the European Union Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) advisory board, serves as the Commissioner of Science and Technical Activities of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and has been a long-standing editor of AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences. He is also a trustee of the Wisconsin chapter of The Nature Conservancy, which has recently increased focused on carbon management and climate resilience of landscapes. If you can't find him in the office or classroom, he's most likely out skiing with his three daughters.

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Assistant Professor, Dept of Earth & Environmental Science, 
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Róisín Commane
Assistant Professor, Dept of Earth & Environmental Science,
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Columbia University

Posted Date:  2021-02-03

Róisín is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University. Her research examines multidisciplinary questions drawing together observations and modeling of atmospheric chemistry and transport with terrestrial ecology and her NACP-affiliated research includes both arctic and urban research. She uses tower and airborne observations of carbon dioxide and methane to understand the response of arctic and boreal ecosystems to the rapidly changing environmental conditions in the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic as part of NASA’s Carbon in the Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) and Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) programs. She was chair of the ABoVE carbon dynamics working group (2017-2019). In urban areas, her group focuses on combining carbon fluxes with atmospheric chemistry/air quality to understand the contribution of various sources to the urban carbon budget. They are developing a network to measure biogenic and anthropogenic fluxes of carbon and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the urban atmosphere (NOAA funding) and to characterize sources of anthropogenic methane in the New York City area (NYSERDA funding). The ongoing atmospheric observations from these measurement networks are allowing her group to investigate the impacts of COVID-19 adaptation to the atmospheric composition of New York City. Róisín’s other research includes airborne observations in the remote atmosphere as part of the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) project and measuring fluxes of carbonyl sulfide at Harvard and Howland Forests to help quantify the magnitude and pathway of gaseous atmospheric mercury deposition in forests. Róisín is currently chair of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) User Working Group and a member of the NACP Science Leadership Group. She also received NASA group achievement awards for both NASA CARVE (2013) and ATom (2018) flight campaigns. Róisín obtained her PhD from University of Leeds, UK in atmospheric chemistry and was a postdoc and Research Associate at Harvard University 2009-2018.

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Forest Carbon and Climate Change Researcher with the Government of British Columbia, Canada, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Calgary and the University of Northern British Columbia.
Caren Dymond
Forest Carbon and Climate Change Researcher with the Government of British Columbia, Canada, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Calgary and the University of Northern British Columbia.
Government of British Columbia

Posted Date:  2020-11-30

Dr. Caren Dymond one of the first to study integrating climate change adaptation and mitigation in forestry. Her research program has led to a number of papers assessing planting seedlings to enhance diversity and aid assisted migration. She co-leads projects assessing partial harvesting and conservation of old growth, evaluating their potential dual benefits of mitigation and adaptation. She leads the development of the Forest Carbon Succession extension to LANDIS-II (currently v3.0) that integrates climate change affects into forest carbon modelling. She also sits on the LANDIS-II Foundation Board that support the modelling framework. Her adaptation-focused work includes collaborating on assessing climate change risks to wildfire, hydrology, water use and economics. Beyond the ecosystem, Dr. Dymond developed a model of carbon flows in North American wood markets. Using that model, she helped define a new carbon metric: Net Sector Productivity, which integrates ecosystem and wood product dynamics and is useful for assessing mitigation strategies. Working with wood products and economists led her to develop two projects examining the assumptions around accounting for product displacement or substitution. Prior to joining BC, Dr. Dymond participated in groundbreaking work demonstrating the importance of natural disturbances in general, and insects specifically to forest carbon budgets. Furthermore, she led the development of a quality control (QC) system for the forest component of Canada’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report and co-wrote papers describing that reporting system and the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector. Dr. Dymond’s policy highlights include co-writing British Columbia’s Protocol for the Generation of Greenhouse Gas Offsets from Forests in 2009. More recently, Dr. Dymond helped develop the Forest Carbon Initiative, a 5-year, $290 million (Canadian) program to implement operational climate mitigation projects with integrated adaptation measures. Her pre-carbon career included remote sensing (e.g. mapping mountain pine beetle damage), fire management (e.g. transferring Canada’s system to the tropics); and vegetation ecology (e.g. finding mechanistic explanations for species distributions). Dr. Dymond has a M.Sc. and a B.Sc. from the University of Calgary, a PhD from Bangor University in 2018 and is a Professional Agrologist. After finishing her masters, Caren started her career in a landscape ecology lab at the University of Wisconsin Madison. After that, she worked for the Canadian Forest Service on various projects over eight years including forest carbon accounting. Caren joined BC’s government as a forest carbon and climate change researcher in 2008.

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Research Ecologist at the Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station in Ogden, UT
Sean P Healey
Research Ecologist at the Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station in Ogden, UT
USDA Forest Service

Posted Date:  2020-10-31

Dr. Sean Healey is a Research Ecologist at the Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station in Ogden, UT. His research interests include identifying changes in disturbance patterns and understanding global climate implications of those changes. He has worked to establish a theoretically grounded framework for inferring forest biomass using NASA’s GEDI (Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation) mission. As a member of the GEDI Science Team, he leads development of OBIWAN, an application that provides forest managers with customized biomass reports based upon GEDI assets. He is also responsible for production of a global coverage of 1km mean biomass estimates as a primary science deliverable for the GEDI mission. Dr. Healey is a member of the Carbon Team of the Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA). He coordinated research about the role of forest disturbance in carbon storage for the National Forest System, and resulting information is now used in the Management Plans of more than 20 national forests. He is a member of the Landsat Science Team, and he leads the science component of the Landsat-based Landscape Change Monitoring System (LCMS), which provides comprehensive maps of forest disturbance and recovery to a wide range of US forest managers. He is also interested in fusion of Landsat with daily high-resolution imagery from Planet, and he leads a new collaboration with the Madagascar Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development to create deforestation alerts for that country.

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Administrative Faculty in the Department of Physics and Graduate Faculty in Hydrologic Sciences
Maureen McCarthy
Administrative Faculty in the Department of Physics and Graduate Faculty in Hydrologic Sciences
University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) / Desert Research Institute (DRI)

Posted Date:  2020-09-30

Maureen I. McCarthy, PhD, is Administrative Faculty in the Department of Physics and Graduate Faculty in Hydrologic Sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Research Faculty in Earth and Ecosystem Sciences at the Desert Research Institute (DRI). She is also Affiliate Faculty in the Montana Climate Office at the University of Montana W.A. Franke College of Forestry & Conservation. Her research portfolio reflects her commitment to forging partnerships to anticipate and respond to climate impacts to water resources, agriculture, and Indigenous communities. Dr. McCarthy manages several large, multi-institutional, transdisciplinary research projects including Water for the Seasons, a collaborative research project focused on sustaining water supplies from Sierra Nevada snowpack to nourish native and non-native economic development, agriculture, and natural resources in the arid lands of the Great Basin. Leading the ARkStorm@Tahoe Project, she collaborates with federal, state and local agencies to improve their ability to predict cascading impacts from extreme winter storms in a changing climate. As Project Director for the Native Waters on Arid Lands Project, she leads a team of researchers, extension agents, and community members working to enhance the climate resilience of tribal agriculture in the Southwest, Great Basin, and Northern Rockies. Dr. McCarthy was the lead author for the Tribal Lands Chapter of the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report, a federally mandated comprehensive report managed by the U.S. Global Climate Research Program that reports every seven years on the state of knowledge about carbon stocks and fluxes in North American. She works closely with Indigenous communities to expand our knowledge of climate resilience through the power of both native wisdom and western science. Dr. McCarthy shares a deep passion for learning lessons from past climates and Indigenous cultures to build a better future. In addition to her academic appointments, Dr. McCarthy is founder and President of McCarthy & Smith Consulting, where she advises federal agencies and private companies on national and homeland security issues, including climate threats to national security. She serves as Program & Commentary Director for the National Security Forum of Norther Nevada organizing programs to promote civil discourse on complex national and environmental security topics. Dedicated to community service Dr. McCarthy was elected to the Board of Supervisors of the Nevada-Tahoe Conservation District, serves on the Advisory Group for the City of Reno Climate Resiliency Task Force, completed a four-year term on the Board of Directors for the Tahoe Prosperity Center, and is Past-President the Rotary Club of Tahoe-Incline. Before moving west, Dr. McCarthy spent nearly fifteen years in Washington, DC, leading national security research, intelligence, and policy analysis programs for the Departments of Defense, Energy and Homeland Security. She served in the Administration of President George W. Bush as a member of the Transition Planning Office responsible for designing and establishing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). She was a member of the Senior Executive Service leading homeland security research & development and intelligence programs. Prior to 9/11, McCarthy was Chief Scientist for the National Nuclear Security Administration in the Department of Energy, leading nuclear security and non-proliferation programs with U.S. Allies, Israel, and the Russian Federation. As the first Defense Policy Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), she advised the Secretary of Defense on compliance and verification for nuclear arms control treaties with the former Soviet Union. Dr. McCarthy was a research scientist directing the Interface Physics Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a Lady Davis Postdoctoral Fellow at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel. She holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the University of Colorado, and a B.Sc. in Chemistry from Boston College. She is an active member of the AAAS, Women in Nuclear, American Geophysical Union, American Chemical Society, and the Cosmos Club of Washington DC.

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Associate Professor in the department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
Gretchen Keppel-Aleks
Associate Professor in the department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
University of Michigan

Posted Date:  2020-08-28

Dr. Gretchen Keppel-Aleks is an associate professor in the department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering at the University of Michigan. Her research spans observations and modeling to understand carbon cycling at regional to global scales. Gretchen works with observations of atmospheric CO2 from in situ and remote sensing platforms, including NASA’s OCO-2 and OCO-3 missions, to probe carbon-climate feedbacks. Recent analyses have focused on understanding drivers of interannual variability in the CO2 growth rate and the amplification of the Northern Hemisphere mean annual cycle. In Gretchen’s lab, observational analyses are coupled with atmospheric transport model simulations to isolate regional carbon cycle imprints, or with prognostic biogeochemical models, such as the Community Earth System Model (CESM), to identify key mechanisms that affect the observations. A key research activity in Gretchen’s lab is to use atmospheric observations for model evaluation and improvement. More recently, the Keppel-Aleks lab has built and deployed sensors for tower-based remote sensing of vegetation properties. Gretchen earned her PhD in Environmental Science and Engineering at the California Institute of Technology (2011) and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California-Irvine as a NOAA Climate and Global Change fellow. Gretchen is involved in community carbon cycle science efforts as a co-chair for the 7th NACP Open Science Meeting, to be held virtually in March 2021, a co-chair for the CESM Biogeochemistry Working Group, and was a contributing author to the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). She was recently awarded an AGU Global Environmental Change Early Career Award.

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Professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society
Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change
M. Altaf Arain
Professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society
Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Posted Date:  2020-07-30

Dr. M. Altaf Arain is a professor in the School of Earth, Environment & Society at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and the Director of the McMaster Centre for Climate Change. His research interests include hydrometeorology; evapotranspiration, forest carbon and water cycles, land surface-atmosphere interaction schemes, eco-hydrological and global climate models. He has established Turkey Point Observatory to study energy, water and carbon exchange processes in managed forest and agricultural ecosystems in Great Lakes region. Turkey Point Observatory includes five research stations, where carbon, water and energy fluxes, soil biogeochemical and plant phenological processes are being studied, including an age-sequence (80, 46 and 18 year-old) of planted pine forests since 2003, a managed deciduous (90-year old) forest since 2012 and an agricultural site, started in June 2020. Dr. Arain is investigating the carbon sequestration potential of these different-age conifer and deciduous forests and exploring how these carbon and water cycles of forests will respond to future climate change and extreme weather events. He is also assessing how different forest management treatments (e.g. variable retention harvesting) will impact the forest growth trajectory, energy exchanges, hydrological processes in response to future climatic stresses and extreme events. This work is utilizing ground based (e.g. eddy covariance, soil CO2 efflux, sapflow, biometric) and airborne (e.g. drone and satellite remote sensing) measurements as well as ecosystem and hydrologic models. Turkey Point Observatory is part of Global Water Futures (GWF) and global Fluxnet programs. Dr. Arain is also involved in the Canadian FloodNet project to study impacts of extreme weather events on urban, semi-urban and rural catchments. Dr. Arain’s group has worked to further develop coupled Canadian Land Surface Scheme and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CLASS-CTEM-N+). CLASS-CTEM is used in the Canadian Earth System Model (CanESM) for climate predictions. His group has developed an integrated regional terrestrial ecosystem and hydrologic model (MESH-CTEM-N+) for catchment-scale studies. He has participated in the NACP Site-level and Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison (MsTMIP) initiatives. Dr. Arain obtained his Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree from the NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan and MSc and PhD degrees from the Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. He was a NASA Global Change Research Fellow (ESS program) and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia and the Institute for the Study of Planet Earth, The University of Arizona. He has served on grant review panels of NSERC-Canada, U.S. Department of Energy: Global Change Research Program and NASA Carbon Monitoring System Program. He was the president of the Canadian Geophysical Union (CGU) - Biogeosciences Section from 2009-2012 and member of the Operational Science Committee of Canadian Carbon Program (CCP) and Science Committee of the Fluxnet-Canada Research Network. He has also served as a member of Planning Committee of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) 2020 Open Science meeting. Dr. Arain has published more than 160 peer-reviewed journal articles. He was listed among Clarivate Analytics-Web of Science top 1% Highly-Cited Researchers in science and social science in 2018.

Dr. Altaf Arain’s Websites:  >>

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Senior Research Scientist
Laura Louise Bourgeau-Chavez
Senior Research Scientist
Michigan Technological University

Posted Date:  2020-06-29

Dr. Laura Bourgeau-Chavez is a senior research scientist at Michigan Tech Research Institute and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the College of Forest Resources and Environmental Science (SFRES) of Michigan Technological University. Her main interests are in using passive and active microwave radar imaging for extracting moisture, inundation and biophysical information from wetland and upland landscapes. Her research includes targeted field campaigns to calibrate and validate remotely-sensed data and to better understand ecosystem function and disturbance effects. She has several projects focused on understanding the effects of land use, wildfire disturbance and/or climate change on ecosystems in North American boreal-taiga regions, tropical lowland and alpine peatlands and the coastal Great Lakes. Her work has led to integration of microwave, lidar and optical sensing for mapping and monitoring wetlands, forest soil moisture, forest biomass, invasive species and wildfire effects. Currently, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez is working on two wildfire projects in the boreal-arctic regions of Alaska and western Canada. Her SUSMAP project focuses on developing satellite data products to monitor drought conditions to better predict wildfire danger and wildfire behavior. The second boreal-arctic project is part of the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez’ ABoVE work is focused on studying the vulnerability of boreal and taiga ecosystems to wildfire through field and remote sensing analysis. The project is particularly concentrated on peatlands because the effects of wildfire in peatlands are largely unknown. Her work has led to remote mapping of peatland and upland ecotypes and two variables contributing to post-fire plant succession; burn severity in the organic soil layers and post-fire soil moisture. In addition, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has several Great Lakes projects focused on understanding the effects of nutrient loading on coastal wetlands and their susceptibility to invasive species, mapping the widespread invasive Phragmites australis and working with wetland managers in developing monitoring and remediation strategies. Using time-series analysis and radar polarimetry, Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has developed methods for monitoring soil moisture and inundation from single band to quad-polarization radar data. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez serves as a co-chair of the Michigan Vernal Pool Partnership Steering Committee’s Remote Sensing Working Group. She also leads the Radar Wetlands and Surface Soil Moisture working group for NASA’s Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment. Dr. Bourgeau-Chavez has been studying microwave sensing of forests and wetlands for thirty years. She has published over 75 journal articles and book chapters on using microwave and optical sensing for mapping and monitoring wetlands, forest soil moisture, forest biomass, invasive species, rare ecosystems and wildfire effects. She is a member of the SMAPVEX19/20 science experiment team focused on developing Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) for soil moisture retrieval from forests. She also leads the Radar Wetlands and Surface Soil Moisture working group for NASA’s Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment where she set the field sampling protocol and developed calibration algorithms for handheld water content reflectometry probes.

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Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Lee Thomas Murray
Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences
University of Rochester

Posted Date:  2020-05-28

Lee Murray is an Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester. He develops and uses global and regional chemistry-transport and chemistry-climate models, informed by satellite and other observations, to explore the nexus of atmospheric chemistry and climate. He has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program, including the development of a 4-D methane isotopologue model to provide additional constraints on regional and global methane source contributions, and to understand changes in the global methane budget at and since the Last Glacial Maximum. He has also initiated continuous monitoring of CO2 and methane at multiple sites across New York State alongside an inverse modeling framework to provide top-down constraints on regional carbon emissions. To that end, he works with policy makers to assist them in characterizing in-state emissions, inform carbon mitigation strategies, and assess if carbon emission reduction goals are being met. Prior to Rochester, he was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, and received his Ph.D. training at Harvard University. Lee is also active in multiple international initiatives aimed at understanding couplings between atmospheric composition and climate, including the IGAC/SPARC Chemistry-Climate Modeling Initiative and the World Climate Research Programme AerChemMIP projects. He frequently engages in outreach efforts aimed at informing the public on carbon emissions and climate change. You can learn more about his research activities and see his live surface methane measurements at http://ees.rochester.edu/atmos.

Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Group  >>

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Associate Research Scientist
Guillermo N. Murray-Tortarolo
Associate Research Scientist
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Posted Date:  2020-04-28

Dr. Guillermo N. Murray-Tortarolo is an Associate Research Scientist at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad (IIES), where he leads the Trans-scalar Ecological Modeling lab. He studies the relationship among physical, biological and social components and how their interactions change from the local to global scales, particularly related to climate change, food security and human wellbeing. In the context of the carbon cycle, he is involved in the North American chapter of the Regional Carbon Cycle Assessment Project (RECCAP2) and is studying the carbon footprint of Mexican plastics, through a complete lifecycle analysis (generation, trade and disposal). He is also actively involved in academic courses on the Earth System and in increasing public awareness and understanding of global environmental issues through lectures, educational activities, talks and different outreach publications. With NACP, Guillermo is serving as a member of the Planning Committee for the (postponed) Open Science Meeting.

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Director of Climate Science
Sarah Cooley
Director of Climate Science
Ocean Conservancy

Posted Date:  2020-03-30

Dr. Sarah Cooley is the Director of Climate Science at Ocean Conservancy, in Washington DC. She has been at Ocean Conservancy since 2014, having also been the Director of the Ocean Acidification Program and also its Science Outreach Manager. She is currently a Coordinating Lead Author on the Oceans and Coastal Ecosystems chapter in Working Group II of the IPCC’s 6th Assessment Report, and part of the SOLAS/IMBER Ocean Acidification Group and the Advisory Board of the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC). Previously she worked at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Project Office. Dr. Cooley also serves as a member of the NACP Science Leadership Group. Dr. Cooley’s scholarly focus spans ocean carbon cycling, science communication, and science-based policy development. She was trained as an ocean carbon cycle scientist and numerical modeler, then moved into interdisciplinary science. At Ocean Conservancy, she works to educate and engage decision-makers and stakeholders from every political perspective at regional to international levels about ocean acidification, identifying ways that different groups can take concrete, stepwise action on the issue. In her work, Dr. Cooley combines science synthesis, strategic communications, political strategy and advocacy, and public advocacy. Follow her on Twitter at @CO2ley or connect on LinkedIn.

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Scientist and group lead
Abhishek Chatterjee
Scientist and group lead
NASA GSFC / USRA GESTAR

Posted Date:  2020-02-27

Abhishek Chatterjee is a scientist and group lead at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Prior to joining GMAO in 2015, he was a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, which included a stint as a Visiting Investigator at the Carnegie Department of Global Ecology (Stanford University). His research expertise lies in carbon cycle science, remote sensing, Earth system modeling and the development of geostatistical and spatial analyses tools for solving large-scale environmental problems. At GMAO, he is leading the development of carbon cycle assimilation and predictive modeling capabilities using NASA’s GEOS model. The use of predictive models to estimate atmospheric carbon growth rates over the next decade directly contribute to NASA’s mission of planning carbon-relevant observations from space. Previously during his PhD, he developed new geostatistical and inverse modeling techniques for modeling greenhouse gas source-sink distributions at global to regional scales. More recently, his focus has been on utilizing remote sensing observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 to explore the carbon-water-energy nexus, and quantify the vulnerability of the global carbon and water cycles to environmental changes and human interventions. He has authored/co-authored multiple peer-reviewed articles, including articles in Science and Nature Scientific Reports. Abhishek is part of multiple NASA mission and science Teams -- the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), the Arctic and Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) and the Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). He works on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program and has also contributed as a lead chapter author for the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). He is highly engaged in various activities that advance the visibility of the carbon cycle science community, including chairing the Flux Working Group of NASA’s CMS Science Team and the Carbon Cycle Dynamics Working Group of NASA’s ABoVE Science Team.

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Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Chaoqun Lu
Assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University

Posted Date:  2020-01-28

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu is an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology at Iowa State University. Her research uses a systems modeling approach to understand, quantify, and predict the terrestrial carbon-nutrient-water dynamics in response to changes in climate, land use, land management practices, and atmospheric composition at various spatial and temporal scales. She has been working on a few projects contributing to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Her recent carbon-related work focuses on reconstructing agriculture-driven land use and management history in the continental U.S., and assessing the consequent carbon storage change and carbon footprint through modeling. Her work has led to 75+ research articles that quantified the biogeochemical cycling, agricultural food production, greenhouse gas fluxes, and carbon and nutrient movement from land to water bodies. Prior to joining Iowa State University, she has been a research fellow and a postdoctoral researcher at Auburn University, and received her PhD training jointly from Chinese Academy of Sciences and Auburn University.

Lab Webpage  >>

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Professor
Thomas W. Boutton
Professor
Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University

Posted Date:  2019-12-30

Tom Boutton is a Professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at Texas A&M University. His research is aimed at improving our understanding of biogeochemical responses to changes in land cover and land uses in grasslands, savannas, and other dryland ecosystems. In these ecosystems, woody plant encroachment is a globally extensive land cover change that has been occurring during the past 150 years. This important vegetation change is likely driven by several potentially interacting local and global phenomena, including reduced fire frequencies, chronic livestock grazing, rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and climate change. At present, Tom is evaluating the long-term (>50 years) impacts of woody plant encroachment, herbivory, and their interaction on soil C, N, P, and S storage and stoichiometry, trace gas fluxes, and on soil microbial community structure and function in juniper-oak savannas of the southern Great Plains. Stable isotope methodology is being utilized to clarify the mechanisms responsible for changes in elemental storage and turnover. Results from his studies should increase our ability to predict changes in ecosystem function following land cover/land use changes, and enhance the representation of these changes in coupled biogeochemistry-climate models. Tom received a B.A. in Biology from St. Louis University, an M.S. in Biology from University of Houston, and a Ph.D. in Botany from Brigham Young University. He is a Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and of the American Society of Agronomy.

Tom Boutton’s Website   >>

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Bassil El Masri
Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University
Murray State University

Posted Date:  2019-10-28

Bassil El Masri is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Murray State University. His research focuses on investigating the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions and how these interactions are affected by the changing climate. He uses multi-sensors remotely sensed data for estimating terrestrial ecosystem carbon and water fluxes and for scaling up site measurements to the regional and global scales. He also uses land surface models to understand the terrestrial ecosystem carbon, water, and nitrogen fluxes responses to environmental change. He was a contributing author to the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). He has been working on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the Multi-Scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). Bassil completed his MS (2006) in Range Management from Texas Tech University, his PhD. (2011) in Geography from Indiana University-Bloomington and a postdoctoral appointment in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. https://sites.google.com/murraystate.edu/elmasri-lab/home

Environmental Modeling and Monitoring Lab  >>

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Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
David Moore
Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment
University of Arizona

Posted Date:  2019-09-17

Dave Moore is an Associate Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. He studies how ecosystems work. He uses both whole ecosystem measurements of carbon, water and energy exchange as well as smaller scale measurements – from tree growth to leaf level photosynthesis to soil microbial functions and nutrient cycling – to study how ecosystem processes respond to change. He uses models and airborne or satellite remote sensing data to integrate these diverse data sources and scale ecosystem processes to landscapes and the globe. He has worked on several projects related to the North American Carbon Program including the effect of bark beetles on carbon cycling in the Western US, long term changes in the carbon cycle of the North Eastern US and currently, carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic. He also contributed to the Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). Previously he has been a faculty member in the Geography Department at King’s College London, a visiting scientist at the National Ecological Observatory Network, and a post-doctoral researcher at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University of Colorado’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. Dave did his graduate work at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Since 2007, Dave has helped to organize the Annual Summer Course in Flux Measurements and Advanced Modelling (The Fluxcourse), which is designed to cross train early career scientists in using measurements and models together. In 2019, he received the Excellence in Earth and Space Science Education Award from the American Geophysical Union.

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Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
Forest Ecologist, Leader of ForestGEO Ecosystems & Climate Program
Forest Ecologist, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Posted Date:  2019-08-14

Kristina is a forest ecologist at the Smithsonian's Conservation Biology Institute's (SCBI) Conservation Ecology Center and at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute’s Center for Tropical Forest Science. She leads the Ecosystems and Climate Program for the Smithsonian-led Forest Global Earth Observatory (ForestGEO), which is the only forest monitoring network making standardized measurements in all the world's major forest biomes. Her research focuses on interactions of forest ecosystems worldwide with Earth’s changing climate. Her research group employs a variety of methods including data synthesis, field research, and modeling to understanding how global change is altering forests around the world and how changes to forest ecosystems will either mitigate or exacerbate climate change. Her research focuses on ForestGEO sites, including the SCBI ForestGEO plot, for which she is one of the Principal Investigators. She led the creation of ForC, a large open-access database of forest carbon stocks and annual fluxes, and is using it to help characterize the potential for climate change mitigation through forest conservation and restoration. Kristina received an undergraduate degree in biology from Wheaton College (2002) and a PhD from the University of New Mexico (2007). In 2019, she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

Forest Global Earth Observatory  >>

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Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
Tara Hudiburg
Associate Professor
Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences

University of Idaho

Posted Date:  2019-07-20

Dr. Tara Hudiburg is an Associate Professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences at the University of Idaho. Before coming to Idaho, she completed her PhD and MS degrees in Forest Science at Oregon State University and a postdoctoral appointment in Plant Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her research investigates the impacts of climate, disturbance, and management on terrestrial biogeochemical cycling, particularly GHG implications. She is an NSF Early Career award recipient and was recently awarded a 2019 PECASE. She uses data-model frameworks to improve and validate process-based models used for predicting future carbon cycle impacts in forest and agricultural ecosystems. Dr. Hudiburg is experimenting with flux methods at her field sites in the Northern Rockies in order develop reliable, inexpensive, and low-power requirement carbon and water balance measurement systems for mountainous terrain.

Dr. Tara Hudiburg Website  >>

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